If these walls could talk

Photo stories combine still images and text to create a simple story. Photo stories rely on basic ideas of video production, they offer an opportunity to provide discussion starters for e new topic. A range of technologies are available to combine still images and text, such as Microsoft Powerpoint. Music can be added to give atmosphere. This example was created as part of the Divis project.

pdfIf these walls could talk

 

Video presentations

 

Created with a group of asylum seekers (Afghanistan, Pakistan, Sub Saharan Africa) within a task based language (Italian  as  L2) learning programme. Learners briefly present themselves to the video camera: who they are, where they come from, what they can do and what they like to do. As preparation, the learners can organise the presentation in a written form.

pdfVideo presentations

Present your school

School presentations are a universal video format where students introduce their own school. The productions can range from simple slide shows to sophisticated video productions. They are useful outcomes for European cooperation and exchange. The core ideas have been developed within the DIVIS project: http://divisproject.eu

Include specific vocabulary related to school in an authentic setting. Develop presentation skills in the foreign language.

pdfPresent your school

 

Als ich 16 war

This activity captures reflection in a foreign language. It follows a standard video production approach and works especially well within adult education. It is also a useful way of capturing a particular use of language, in this case tense.

pdfAls ich 16 war

 

Remembering an event – Pecha Kucha day

Students create a video clip with pictures, videos, interviews and bloopers and outtakes with classmates and teachers about a specific project done in class or a special event which took place at school. This is an excellent way to reflect on the learning process (especially through the interviews) and a good keepsake for students which they love having, watching and sharing. It is also useful to be used with future students so that they see the work done by “real” people like them. Bloopers and outtakes are really funny and add enjoyment to the final product.

pdfPecha Kucha memories

Introducing yourself

This is a talking head video, where most of the screen is taken up with the image of the person introducing themselves. Made as part of a virtual exchange collaboration between students of German at Warwick University Language Centre and students of Media in Stuttgart. Connecting using Google+, the students scripted and created short video clips which they exchanged on their G+ community page.

pdfIntroducing yourself

 

Poem realisation

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Poem Realisation

 

 

A compilation of Creative Commons licensed images and good quality audio recording of a poem produced by a student in Higher Education who has completed a Beginner’s course in French. Combining an audio track with a collection of images to create a video poem is a simple technique and ensures that the meaning and delivery of the poem is examined. The resulting reosurce can be used by others for commentary or remixing.

Online display

This collection of video clips was made by Higher Education students in Blaise Pascal University, Clermont Ferrand, France. They are all learning English and chose a favourite recipe which they explain and demonstrate making. Their video clips are created and published online and the URL used to create a QR code. These graphic codes can be scanned using a free QR code reader and playback on mobile devices.

Scan the QR code on your phone to view the playlist.

pdfOnline display

Using video to provide model answers

In this example the students have been sent a model answer to a question using screen cast technology. The teacher has highlighted the key points that should have been included in the answer using a word processor and then created the video where the teacher talks through the answer and what should be included. The teacher then sends the model answer to the students, who can then use the video to evaluate their own work. This can be an excellent way of doing self-evaluation since the students can listen to the video and decide what mark they should get, what was missing from their own essay etc.

The idea of the model answer video is to encourage the students to reflect and think about their own work. It is cognitively more demanding to get the students to think about their own work rather than simply provide feedback to the students.  It works best where all the students are all writing the same essay since it would be impossible to create model answers for each question if each student did something different. Model examples of presentations, telling a story, describing something could all help students reflect on their own work.

pdfUsing video to provide model answers

 

Using video for mini grammar lessons

This is a screen cast where the teacher has created a simple mini grammar lesson. The teacher has noticed there are problems with a certain grammar rule and simply written out some examples in Microsoft Word and then used a screen cast technology to record themselves going over the rule. It is very quick to make and requires minimum technological skills. The teacher can send the video to the students or put it on a blog, wiki or on the virtual learning environment of the school or institution.

The teacher simply marks out the area of the screen and clicks a button. Whatever is under the marked area will be recorded as a video along with the voice. It makes no difference to the screen cast tool what is on the screen. It simply records the area that has been marked out. This particular example was used using SnagIt. There are also other solutions such as ScreenR and JING.

pdf Using video for mini grammar lessons