CLILstore: creating web content.

Step-by-step guide on how to embed a video-clip into an internet text page, add any text (or transcription) to the text page, link all the words of the text to an online dictionary, and link to other electronic practice exercises, such as Hot Potatoes. The CLIL store project was funded by the EU. The repository of existing units is open access, therefore, teachers or students wishing to use existing units do not have to register with the service before viewing or using the materials. The authoring interface has been designed to be user-friendly, however, new users are encouraged to read the step by step guides provided on the project website and if possible to avail of one of the many training workshops offered by the Tools team.

pdfCLILstore

In the restaurant

Video created by Language School PELICAN in Czech Republic as one of
the POOLS-3 Project outputs.

Using video in class should include pre and post viewing activities.
Before viewing you can ask students to predict key expressions or
brainstorm vocabulary. During viewing a tick list could be used to help
keep track of the language. Follow-up activities should encourage
students to use the information they have gathered and to explore
concepts or ideas contained in the video. A large variety of strategies are
available as post-viewing activities. These strategies can serve to
consolidate and extend learning.

pdfIn the restaurant

 

 

Exploring vocabulary

This video demonstrates how language learners can use the TOOLS project dictionary tool. The project was funded by the EU.

Computer Assisted Language Learning can particularly help for teaching the less widely taught languages. Use of a computer or mobile apps can increase access to resources and tools but learning design should always include a range of activities. Exploring vocabulary in this way can help learners to take control of their learning and construct meaning themselves.

 

pdfExploring vocabulary

Present your school

School presentations are a universal video format where students introduce their own school. The productions can range from simple slide shows to sophisticated video productions. They are useful outcomes for European cooperation and exchange. The core ideas have been developed within the DIVIS project: http://divisproject.eu

Include specific vocabulary related to school in an authentic setting. Develop presentation skills in the foreign language.

pdfPresent your school

 

Remembering an event – Pecha Kucha day

Students create a video clip with pictures, videos, interviews and bloopers and outtakes with classmates and teachers about a specific project done in class or a special event which took place at school. This is an excellent way to reflect on the learning process (especially through the interviews) and a good keepsake for students which they love having, watching and sharing. It is also useful to be used with future students so that they see the work done by “real” people like them. Bloopers and outtakes are really funny and add enjoyment to the final product.

pdfPecha Kucha memories

Learn my language..it’s fun! Araba Euskaraz

Students created a video to promote their language and culture.This video encourages people to speak Basque and not set it aside. Teachers in the video encourage everyone to speak Basque at school, with friends and with the family and to enjoy speaking that language. Besides launching this message, they are celebrating Ikastola’s Day. Every year, the Basque community create a new video with the same topic.

pdf Learn my language!

Online display

This collection of video clips was made by Higher Education students in Blaise Pascal University, Clermont Ferrand, France. They are all learning English and chose a favourite recipe which they explain and demonstrate making. Their video clips are created and published online and the URL used to create a QR code. These graphic codes can be scanned using a free QR code reader and playback on mobile devices.

Scan the QR code on your phone to view the playlist.

pdfOnline display

Event capture

This recording of researcher Robert O’Dowd presenting his description of the skills necessary for teachers to facilitate Online intercultural Exchange (OIE) was part of an online conference which was organised and hosted by the Language Centre at the University of Warwick. Recording a webinar or event is a great way of sharing afterwards and allows more people to review and respond to the content.

pdfEvent capture

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